Japan’s faculty of wonder

Japan: Wondering About the Meaning of Life: Global Voices Online

To Live
To live,
to live now, means
to become thirsty,
to be dazzled by the sun filtering through the tree leaves,
to unexpectedly remember a melody,
to sneeze,
to join hands with you.

To live,
to live now, means
miniskirts,
planetariums,
Johann Strauss,
Picasso,
the Alphs,
meeting all kinds of beautiful things,
and
rejecting carefully the hidden evil.
To live,
to live now, means
to be able to cry,
to be able to laugh,
to be able to get angry,
to be free.

To live,
to live now, means
now a dog is barking in a far place,
now the earth is turning around,
now somewhere a baby’s first cry is raised,
now somewhere a soldier is wounded,
now a swing is swinging,
now “now” is passing.

To live,
to live now, means
a bird flaps its wings,
the sea thunders,
a snail crawls,
people love,
the warmth of your hands,
life itself.

生きる  

生きているということ
いま生きているということ
それはのどがかわくということ
木漏れ日がまぶしいということ
ふっと或るメロディを思い出すということ
くしゃみをすること
あなたと手をつなぐこと

生きているということ
いま生きているということ
それはミニスカート
それはプラネタリウム
それはヨハン・シュトラウス
それはピカソ
それはアルプス
すべての美しいものに出会うということ
そして
かくされた悪を注意深くこばむこと

生きているということ
いま生きているということ
泣けるということ
笑えるということ
怒れるということ
自由ということ

生きているということ

いま生きているということ
いま遠くで犬が吠えるということ
いま地球が廻っているということ
いまどこかで産声があがるということ
いまどこかで兵士が傷つくということ
いまぶらんこがゆれているということ
いまいまがすぎてゆくこと

生きているということ
いま生きてるということ
鳥ははばたくということ
海はとどろくということ
かたつむりははうということ

人は愛するということ

あなたの手のぬくみ
いのちということ

Disaster Sushi Set

Sipping his sake and eating his “Disaster Sushi Set,” a local construction planning company president reminds me and my colleague that modern Japanese descend from samurai warriors and kamikaze pilots who were willing, without complaint, to meet their fate. The bearded, smiling Takeshi Munakata says he believes in Japan and Japanese technology to pull the nation through the triple tragedy but if “I die, OK. No problem.”

Stoicism Amid Disaster: Japanese Region Quietly Grinds to a Halt

But looting isn’t happening in Japan

http://caffertyfile.blogs.cnn.com/2011/03/15/why-is-there-no-looting-in-japan/

Looting is something we see after almost every tragedy; for example: last year’s earthquakes in Haiti and Chile, the floods in England in 2007, and of course Hurricane Katrina back in 2005. It happens when some people who’ve seen life as they know it get tossed out the window feel that all morality has been tossed out too. It’s survival of the fittest and whatever you can get your hands on is yours, no matter who it belongs to.

But that’s not happening in Japan.